Alerts

KnowBe4 Security Tips - Staying Safe Around Always Listening Devices

With the overwhelming popularity of always-listening devices such as Alexa, Google Home, and smartphones, you’ve probably heard stories of these devices joining in on conversations without being prompted. Perhaps it’s even happened to you!

While this idea can be alarming and unsettling, there are ways to protect your private information, and conversations, from these always-listening devices. To help you stay safe from these devices, here are some tips:

Scam of the Week: Watch Out for Rebate Scams

Internet criminals are posing as trustworthy sources so they can trick you into thinking you have earned a reimbursement or rebate. If you fall for it, the bad guys will end up with your banking information or credit card number.

They will pretend to be from the government, a bank, or another trusted organization, and they’ll ask you to make a small, initial “administration fee” in order to claim the amount that is supposedly owed to you.

Update your software now - FTC article

Computers, tablets, phones and other personal devices hold your emails and your financial and tax documents (with your Social Security numbers).

Watch out for Fake Legal Threats in Your Inbox

Scam of the Week: Watch Out for Fake Legal Threats in Your Inbox

The bad guys are currently using fake legal threats to scare you into downloading their malicious attachments. These email scams typically inform you that your organization is going to be sued. You’re instructed to review the attached file for details and to respond within a few days or further action will be taken against you. Once you open the attachment, which is usually a Microsoft Word document, your computer is instantly infected with Malware.

Elder Abuse: Who it affects, why it happens, and how to spot it.

Who Does it Affect?

“Elder abuse”, or the mistreatment of older adults, occurs among people from all income levels and walks of life.  Citizens above age 65 are most susceptible.  It can take the form of physical, sexual, emotional or financial abuse.

The perpetrators of financial abuse are typically family members, friends, or trusted advisors that are well aware of the senior’s financial situation.  Someone tries to develop a level of trust with the older adult so they will voluntarily give away their assets.

Scam of the Week: Spike in Malicious PDF File Scams, Again!

PDF files are commonly used in most organizations, regardless of what industry you work in. That’s why PDFs are often thought of as a “safe” file type. Do you hesitate to open them?

Over the past few months, there’s been an increase in the bad guys taking advantage of this trusted file type. They’re finding ways to hide malware in PDFs so they make it past the security filters your organization has in place. Most often, the malware is executed once you open the PDF and click on a misleading link in the file.

WiFi? Why Not?

KnowBe4 Security Tips - WiFi? Why Not? VPN is your friend

Using free public WiFi at a coffee shop or airport hot spot is great for convenience, but bad for security.
Most free access points do not make use of encryption. This is done for convenience and ease of access. If every person had to ask the barista or gate attendant for the WiFi key, it would get unruly, and no actual work would get done.
Keep in mind that you are sharing those wireless airwaves with anyone that is within range of your wireless communications.

Phishing: Don't Take the Bait

Phishing is when you get emails, texts, or calls that seem to be from companies or people you know. But they're actually from scammers. They want you to click on a link or give personal information (like a password) so that they can steal your money or identity, and maybe get access to your computer. 

THE BAIT

Scammers use familiar company names or pretend to be somone you know. 

Cybersecurity for small business: Email authentication

As a business person, you know about phishing, of course. At first glance, the email looks like it comes from a recognized company, complete with a familiar logo, slogan, and URL. But it’s really from a cyber crook trying to con consumers out of account numbers, passwords, or cash. In addition to the serious injury these scams inflict on consumers, there’s another victim of phishing: the reputable business whose good name was stolen by the scammer.

Scam of the Week: Look Out for Social Security Number Scams

The bad guys have come up with a scam to steal your Social Security Number (SSN). These fraudulent vishing, or “voice phishing” attempts often appear to come from the actual Social Security Administration (SSA) number–but the scammers are faking it.

When you answer the phone, the bad guys claim that your SSN has been suspended due to suspicious activity or involvement in criminal activity. They’ll also claim your bank account will be seized, to shock you into action. The scammers will then ask you to confirm your SSN in order to reactivate it–don’t fall for this trick!

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